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9 Comments

  1. Docage Reply

    Over time, cassette tapes can become worn and damaged, but they can be restored to a playable condition. Unraveled or Chewed Cassettes. Pull out the tape from the cassette. Pull until the tape is to the end point on the tape heads (cogwheels). Insert a ballpoint pen into the right-hand tape head.

  2. Grokazahn Reply

    BASF developed a chrome cassette designed for use with µs (type I) playback equalization but this idea only caught on for commercially pre-recorded cassettes.[2] Notches on top of the cassette shell indicate the type of tape within. Type I cassettes only have write-protect notches, Type II have an additional pair next to the write.

  3. Samurr Reply

    Images on an Audio Cassette: If you have some old cassettes, a computer, and a love for obscure technology, here's a fun project to waste a couple extra hours on. Using a type of amateur television broadcasting that dates back to the early days of space travel, you can store.

  4. Kazrarisar Reply

    Sep 06,  · 50+ videos play all mix - audio cassette tape easy fix: open non-screwed cassette and repair felt pad pressure pad youtube How to Fix Cassette Tapes The Right Way. Open, Splice, Repair Like a Pro.

  5. Mira Reply

    Oct 16,  · Co-founder Jen Long of Kissability, said: “Cassette tapes aren’t just a format, they’re a culture, and cassette culture is as much about collaboration as doing it yourself. “This year we’ve gone even further to try and include as many tape fans around the world. We want as many people as possible to be able to get involved and put out.

  6. Samushicage Reply

    You can load paper up to this size in the lower paper cassette: Legal ( × 14 inches [ × mm]). Note: Do not remove or insert the paper cassette during printing. Close the output tray, if necessary. Note: As you slide in the output tray, there may be .

  7. Magar Reply

    Your cassette is an integral part of your bike’s drivetrain. Found on the drive side of your rear hub, it consists of a number of circular metal discs with teeth around the edge, ranging from small to large – these are called ‘sprockets’.

  8. Jutaxe Reply

    Apr 21,  · Noob bike question here, but I suspect my rear cassette to my Cervelo isn't what I thought it was. I can't find a stamp showing if it's a , , or Is there any easy way to find out what it is without removing the cassette? (I don't have a cassette removal tool yet.).

  9. Brazilkree Reply

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